Britain - will there alwasy be an England?

Britain - will there alwasy be an England?

Postby meteorite » Sat Jul 15, 2017 5:26 pm

Many fans consider the British Grand Prix the quintessential motorsport event, and Silverstone the fundamental venue. But now Silverstone is under threat; the British Racng Drivers Club, owners of the historic circuit, say that looking ahead Liberty Media are demanding too much from the organizers, more than they can afford, and 2019 will be the last running.

How devastating will that be? There are other circuits. Among the great all-time races in history is the British GP run in the rain at Brands Hatch, and won by Ayrton Senna in an exhibition truly enough to make on believe in witchcraft. Those were that days when Brands alternated with Silverstone, where Nigel Mansell scored some of his greatest wins. a track rich in history and tradition. But there were sound reasons why the BRDC and Silverstone were given their monopoly and they were on ,display today - the massive, cheering, enthusiatic crowds; the colour, the side events, that indescribable sense of occasion in the air. Can that ever be replaced? It is a bedrock piece now of Formual One history and tradition, and Liberty needs must think long and hard before they tamper with it.

So how will it all start?




14 16 Jul 2017 Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone


Starting grid
Qualifying


Pos No Driver Car Q1 Q2 Q3 Laps
1 44 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1:39.069 1:27.893 1:26.600 25
2 7 Kimi Räikkönen Ferrari 1:40.455 1:28.992 1:27.147 26
3 5 Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 1:39.962 1:28.978 1:27.356 24
4 77 Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 1:39.698 1:28.732 1:27.376 26
5 33 Max Verstappen Red Bull Racing TAG Heuer 1:38.912 1:29.431 1:28.130 23
6 27 Nico Hulkenberg Renault 1:39.201 1:29.340 1:28.856 21
7 11 Sergio Perez Force India Mercedes 1:42.009 1:29.824 1:28.902 26
8 31 Esteban Ocon Force India Mercedes 1:39.738 1:29.701 1:29.074 25
9 2 Stoffel Vandoorne McLaren Honda 1:40.011 1:30.105 1:29.418 24
10 8 Romain Grosjean Haas Ferrari 1:42.042 1:29.966 1:29.549 26
11 30 Jolyon Palmer Renault 1:41.404 1:30.193 18
12 26 Daniil Kvyat Toro Rosso 1:41.726 1:30.355 20
13 14 Fernando Alonso McLaren Honda 1:37.598 1:30.600 17
14 55 Carlos Sainz Toro Rosso 1:41.114 1:31.368 15
15 19 Felipe Massa Williams Mercedes 1:41.874 1:31.482 21
16 18 Lance Stroll Williams Mercedes 1:42.573 11
17 20 Kevin Magnussen Haas Ferrari 1:42.577 11
18 94 Pascal Wehrlein Sauber Ferrari 1:42.593 10
19 9 Marcus Ericsson Sauber Ferrari 1:42.633 10
20 3 Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull Racing TAG Heuer 1:42.966 4

Q1 107% Time - 1:44.429

There will be some revisions. Bottas will drop five places on the grid with a gearbox replacement penalty. Ricciardo blew his turbo in first qualifying, so he can share the bottom row with Alonso who had 30 positions worth of new engine parts installed.

The start could get exciting. Silverstone is a very open, high=speed circuit with many opportunities to pass but there is a high probabilty of rain forecast as well. The track configuration provides enormous downforce - but when it does let go, there is no telling where the car will end up. It could become an adventurous way to spend an afternoon.

Hamilton's pole tied him with Jim Clark for consecutive Silverstone poles. It left him one short of Michael Schumacher's all-time top. He can also match Clark's record fr overall wins. Incentive abounds. Will performance come up to it?
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Re: Britain - will there alwasy be an England?

Postby meteorite » Sun Jul 16, 2017 9:54 pm

Two major race in one day impose a creative overload, so let's start with the bare bones of what happened:


2017 FORMULA 1 ROLEX BRITISH GRAND PRIX - RACE RESULT

14 16 Jul 2017 Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone
Race result
Pos No Driver Car Laps Time/Retired Pts
1 44 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 51 1:21:27.430 25
2 77 Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 51 +14.063s 18
3 7 Kimi Räikkönen Ferrari 51 +36.570s 15
4 33 Max Verstappen Red Bull Racing TAG Heuer 51 +52.125s 12
5 3 Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull Racing TAG Heuer 51 +65.955s 10
6 27 Nico Hulkenberg Renault 51 +68.109s 8
7 5 Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 51 +93.989s 6
8 31 Esteban Ocon Force India Mercedes 50 +1 lap 4
9 11 Sergio Perez Force India Mercedes 50 +1 lap 2
10 19 Felipe Massa Williams Mercedes 50 +1 lap 1
11 2 Stoffel Vandoorne McLaren Honda 50 +1 lap 0
12 20 Kevin Magnussen Haas Ferrari 50 +1 lap 0
13 8 Romain Grosjean Haas Ferrari 50 +1 lap 0
14 9 Marcus Ericsson Sauber Ferrari 50 +1 lap 0
15 26 Daniil Kvyat Toro Rosso 50 +1 lap 0
16 18 Lance Stroll Williams Mercedes 50 +1 lap 0
17 94 Pascal Wehrlein Sauber Ferrari 50 +1 lap 0
NC 14 Fernando Alonso McLaren Honda 32 DNF 0
NC 55 Carlos Sainz Toro Rosso 0 DNF 0
NC 30 Jolyon Palmer Renault 0 DNS 0

As the results sheet shows, the whole show was basically a Mercedes benefit. So why is the Formula One world so silly about this particulare event? The story is long and colicated, but will be explained shortly.
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Re: Britain - will there alwasy be an England?

Postby meteorite » Mon Jul 17, 2017 9:46 pm

Those of us who were around then will remember that motorsports had an odd, peripheral status before World War 2. It is not that there were not big events; pre-WW1 the Americans had races such as the Vanderbilt Cup, and the Indianapolis 500 passed its 100th running as couple of years back. There were fairgrounds races at county and state fairs, some of which continue to this day, and for a while the notoriously deadly boardtracks were in vogue. The bootleggers were laying the foundations of NASCAR in the south. But even though a few European racecars were imported and run with some success, Europe was where the action was at.

World War 2 changed all that. Europe and America became aware of each other. Trade stifled by Depression and war restarted. Britain, financially exhausted by war, desperately sought export revenues - and one easy target was automobiles. Especially sports and racing automobiles. I still remember my first sight of a Jaguar XK-120, the roadster model painted a rich cream. parked on a street (and surrounded by a huge crowd) in Kingston, ON. Imagine its impact in a city full of late-40s Plymouth and Nash and Pontiac and Hudson and Oldsmobile and Desoto family sedans. Jaguar was as expensive then as it is now - but we could afford to respond to its small cousins the Brits were firing across the water, the MGs (TCs, then TDs, and TFs, and finally in fall 1955 the MGA, the Triumphs running the TR-s from 2 to 3 to 4 and 5 ,6,7.8 (in later years), the Big Healey then Sprite/MG Midget, the oddbalss like Morgan and HRG and Singer. Eventually the Japanese arrived but by then British=sports cars was a well established equation.

Economical transatlantic aviation started n this period. People visited Europe and the automobile sportsmen discovered a new world. Television grew,took on colour and eventually reached across the ocean too. In time we no long had to wait for our magazine with its month-long deadline and publication interval to tell us what had happened.

It was into this changing world that Silverstone Racetrack was born. One of dozens of wartime airfields quickly abandoned, it had been spotted unattended by local sheep farmers who let their animals graze there. But little Silverstone village had its quota of carnuts. too, who quietly slipped out one weekend, placed a few oil drums and haybales in strategic places, and convened their own race meeting. Word spread, and the idea needed more formal arrangements, so the Royal Automobile Club was brought in to arrange a proper lease with the government and govern future events.

In 1950 under the aegis of the International Automobile Federation (FIA) a structure was built to restore motor racing to its previous level of co-ordination and enthusiasm. Under sports, international scheduling and sanctioning was set up, together with a world championship series of national races for cars built to a specific formula, called Grands Prix. (There was also an floating honorary designation, Grand Prix of Europe, with little present-day meaning).

The first GP ever, the British Grand Prix, was run in May 1950. It was attended by our King,George VI and his consort Queen Elisabeth, mother of our current Queen. It was the only British motor racing event ever attended by a reigning monarch. And though over the years politics and turf wars, and moved at times to Donnington, Aintree, Brands Hattch and other venues, Silverstone remains the first and foundational location of the British Grand Prix, with entry lists that constitute not only every drop of the cream of British talent, but the top stars from every nation able to produce a worthy competitor.

When Lewis Hamilton stepped from his car at the finish of the race, he was heir to a tradition of excellence hoary with honourable tradition longer than his own lifetime. And he had acquitted himself in the most effective way possible. It was as if he served up each fan with a triple-scoop ice cream sundae, with pole position, fastest lap and decisive victory as the main treat, with a victory for his teammate for the whipped cream and jump to one-point contenti0n in the championship standings as the cherry on top. No wonder he, and his team, and the British crowd were wildly ecstatic. It was total victory.

No doubt Hamilton will drive better races, and Silverstone will see more. But in terms of the total satisfaction of everyone concerned, this will long stand as one of the great races in Formula One history.
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